power of attorney

Financial Power of Attorney | Baron Law | Cleveland, Ohio

Financial power attorney (POA) is a set of documents that you’re giving your agent the ability to act and make financial decisions on your behalf. They’re most commonly used in an elder law scenario. They can also be used in a crisis scenario, if you are overseas, a business owner, and you need to elect someone to make those decisions on your behalf.

Are There Different Types of Powers of Attorneys?

General and Limited:

A general power of attorney gives your agent the ability to govern any part of your estate plan. Whereas, a limited power of attorney is restricted from having control over certain aspects of your estate that you deem fit.

Springing and Current:

A springing power of attorney only allows your agent to act when a certain offense occurs. Whereas, a current power of attorney can act at any time. We recommend that clients have a current power of attorney because it can be difficult to really point out a point time when the springing power returning comes into effect.

How Do I Know if My Financial POA is Up-To-Date?

Financial power of attorney laws changed in 2012, so if you have not updated your power of attorney since then, you’ll want to get it updated as soon as possible.

In addition, you’ll want to look for hot powers in your financial power of attorney, which are:

  • Gifting Powers
  • Powers Over Beneficiary designations
  • Powers Over Retirement Accounts
  • Ability to Make Trusts
  • Safety Deposit Boxes

These are the hot powers, and if you don’t have those, then financial institutions may not warrant your financial power of attorney. It’s really important that you look for these in your document.


Estate planning can seem like a big hassle because they are so many levels which require close detail. If you want to make sure your financial POA is up-to-date and can really act on your behalf, contact us at Baron Law today.

Baron Law Estate Planning Attorney

Preventing Children From Blowing Through Their Inheritance

Blood is thicker than water and we get to pick our friends, not our families. There are a lot of pithy and whimsical sayings that have been passed down through the generations that attempt to explain and characterize the complex and often contradictory nature of family relations. When it comes to deciding who gets the money and stuff after a family member dies, often, tragically, the baser natures of our family members are on full display.

Trusts are an ubiquitous estate planning tool that a lot of people have heard about but not a lot of people know the details of how they work. Trusts afford privacy for trust assets, control over how, when, and if trust assets are distributed, and potential protection against creditors, litigants, divorce, and greedy family members. All these benefits associated with trusts sound great but how exactly is all this accomplished? Once again, consulting with an experienced Cleveland estate planning attorney is always the quickest and best way to get your estate planning questions answered.

  • What are spendthrift trusts/provisions?

A common concern for estate planners is, how do I prevent my descendants from wasting their inheritance? A quick look at any one of the innumerable stories of multi-million dollar lottery winners who end up broke and destitute a few years later illustrates how most who come into vast sums of money quickly tend to spend that money unwisely. Now, if you decide using a trust is right for you and your family, within the structure of your trust, you can write in terms that will lower the opportunities for named beneficiaries to squander their trust distributions. Though not %100 foolproof, spendthrift trusts and spendthrift provisions are very common tools for trust makers to use to protect their trust and protect trust beneficiaries from themselves.

In Ohio a spendthrift trust is a trust that imposes a restraint on the voluntary and involuntary transfer of the beneficiary’s interest in trust assets assigned to that particular beneficiary.

Under Ohio law, specifically the Ohio Trust Code, spendthrift provisions are terms within a trust which restrain the transfer of a trust beneficiary’s interest. Spendthrift provisions block both voluntary transfer of trust assets stemming from the beneficiary action and volition and involuntary transfer of trust assets, usually from creditors or assignees whose claims are usually traceable back to a named trust beneficiary.  See O.R.C. § 5801.01 (T).  As a general rule, a spendthrift provision is valid under the UTC only if it restrains both voluntary and involuntary transfer.

For illustration purposes, here is an example of a bare bones spendthrift provision. Note, an experienced estate planning attorney would not solely rely on the follow language to protect you.

“A. Spendthrift Limits. No interest in a trust under this instrument shall be subject to the beneficiary’s liabilities or creditor claims  or to assignment or anticipation.”

How do they work?

Looking at the legal definition for spendthrift trusts and spendthrift provisions, it may be difficult to understand how these operate and, consequently, how they may be beneficial. In a nut shell, if a trust is or has a spendthrift provision, in most circumstances, trust assets are not subject to enforcement of a judgment until it is distributed to the beneficiary. This means that a trust beneficiary cannot use trust property that is assigned to them as collateral for a loan or to pay off a civil judgment.

 Thus, spendthrifts can prevent creditors, litigants, or the beneficiaries themselves from reaching into the trust to take assets contrary to the terms of the trust. This “reaching in” usually stems from beneficiary misconduct. Note, however, in some circumstances, spendthrift can be circumvented. Namely, in the case of certain child support obligations and claims of the State of Ohio or the United States. Whether spendthrifts can be circumvented depends highly on the nature of the claim against the trust and the nature and language of the trust. An experienced Ohio estate planning attorney is in the best position to determine if and when a particular creditor can reach past a spendthrift and get at trust assets.

Why do I need them?

Put bluntly, no one likes having their money or property taken from them. Or in this instance, by creditors, litigants, or claimants of beneficiaries uncontemplated by the language of the trust. A primary reason for any grantor in making a trust is to ensure control of trust assets. So, if unknown third parties reach into a trust due to a beneficiary doing something unwise, it goes contrary to express wishes of the grantor and all the effort that went into making a trust.

Further, premature distributions of trust assets can have serious consequences for trust management. The “internal finances” of a trust are often based upon assumptions regarding the amount of money/assets within trust accounts and predetermined distribution times. So, if money/assets are taken early this can lead to premature exhaustion of trust funds which may affect the whether future trust distributions can occur at all, in that trustees can’t distribute what isn’t there. Further, premature distribution may leave trustees with insufficient assets to pay trust taxes or administrative costs. There is also the unfairness of premature distribution, why should beneficiaries who followed the terms of the trust get their distributions later or in a lesser amount than the beneficiary who has creditors, civil judgments, or owes back child support.

The importance of comprehensive and effective drafting a trust terms cannot be understated. Often it is what is left out of trust documents which end up hurting grantors and trust beneficiaries. Spendthrift trusts and spendthrift provisions can come in a variety of forms to match the needs and desires of a particular grantor. The utility of spendthrifts, however, can only be enjoyed by grantors if a competent Ohio estate planning attorney is used in the formulation and drafting of a trust. Never underestimate the importance of matching good legal counsel with comprehensive estate planning.

Helping You and Your Loved Ones Plan for the Future.

Essentials of Estate Planning

Estate Planning Essentials in Cleveland, Ohio

In a nutshell, estate planning is the most basic form of asset protection for you and your children. Over the years, estate planning has evolved into much more than just the protection of your assets, but it also discusses your preferences for long term care, probate avoidance, and efficiency.

What Should I have as Part of My Estate Planning?

Essentials of Estate PlanningWill

A will is the bare minimum you want to have for your estate plans. Your will names an executor and distinguishes how your assets are dispersed.

HIPPA Authorizations

HIPPA Authorization is the ability for your loved ones to obtain your medical records on your behalf.

Guardians

You want to establish guardianship not only for your minor children, but you also want to establish guardianship in your plan for you. As you get older, you may not be able to take care of yourself, and you may need to have somebody to make decisions for you

Living Will

A living will is different than a will. A living will does not designate where your assets go but rather a living will is you legally stating that in the event that you are unable to live without machine assistance, and you can’t make decisions then and there, that you wish to be taken off life support. This takes away the ability for anyone but you to make the decision on whether you are kept alive or not.

Healthcare Power of Attorney

The ability for your loved ones to make health care decisions on your behalf.

Durable Power of Attorney

The ability for your loved ones to make financial decisions on your behalf.

What if You Do Not Have an Estate Plan?

If you do not have an estate plan, your assets will be dispersed according to the state’s plan for you. This is not an ideal way to handle your estate because you and your loved ones have no control over the estate.

How Often Should You Review Your Estate Plan?

We recommend that you review your estate plan every three years. However, we do an annual review of your plan and reach out to you to check in on how you feel about your current plan.

In addition, you want to make sure you’re keeping all of your contacts current in your estate plans. The average person moves 11.7 times in their lives so not only may your address and phone number change but so could your executor, health care power of attorney, or any other person mentioned in your plan.

Trusts and Family Trusts Go a Step Further

Trusts take your estate planning to the next level. Trusts give you more power over your estate even after you have passed. Trusts also more efficient, and they help you avoid probate.

Contact Baron Law

Whether you have an estate plan or not, Baron law can help you make sure your assets are protected. Visit us at our website or contact us to schedule a free consultation about your estate planning today.

What is the Difference Between a Trust and a Will in Estate Planning?

What is a Will?

A will is a basic document outlining your wishes for your estate. It identifies an executor of your estate and provides the opportunity to divide your assets among your beneficiaries. This tool allows you to control the future care for any minor children and division of your assets. Without a will, the laws of your state will determine how your assets are divided. Therefore, a will is the minimum estate plan you need to care for your family and your assets. However, the purpose of a will is to guide the probate court to act in accordance with your desired plan.

What are the limitations with a will?

Probate

A will does not avoid probate court, and the average time to administer a will through probate is 18 months, while the minimum is six months. The length of this process can place a burden on the family left behind, and it allows creditors to make claims on any debts you owe.

Cost

Probate requires a number of fees–on average 5-7% of the value of the estate.

Public Transaction

Anything that goes through probate is public information. This means that both your assets and the way you choose to divide them become public, able to be found online in detail.

What is a Trust?

A trust is another form of estate planning that allows you to divide your assets as you desire. While this is similar to a will, a trust allows greater control and bypasses the limitations of a will as seen above.

A trust avoids probate, thus freeing your assets and your family from the court system. As such, probate fees are also avoided, and your personal information (assets and beneficiaries) is kept private.

What are other benefits of a trust?

Taxes

Saving on taxes is one benefit of a trust. However, given current tax laws, this is not an advantage unless your estate’s value is over 10 million dollars. Note, though, that this exemption is subject to change, and tax benefits may become more valuable.

Asset Protection

This is the biggest reason people use trusts over wills. Trusts allow for greater protection of the estate in case of something unexpected such as a beneficiary who develops a credit issue, or the possibility of a divorce.


If you are realizing that estate planning is more important and less simple than you thought, Baron Law will walk you through every step to ensure that your family and your assets are protected. To learn more about the difference between a will and a trust, or to begin planning for your future, contact the estate planning attorneys at Baron Law today.