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Garnishment: Exceptions

Because of the recent upturn in the housing market, it has never been a better time to purchase property for the purpose of renting it out. Not only do new homeowners receive an appreciable asset but, if they are willing to take on increased risk and responsibility, they can make steady income through tenant payments. […]

Estate Planning Attorney - Baron Law

I Need Medicaid, How Can I Keep My Home?

Baron Law LLC, Cleveland, Ohio, offers information for you to reflect upon while you are setting out looking for an estate planning attorney to help protect as much of your assets as you can. For more comprehensive information contact Baron Law Cleveland to draft your comprehensive estate plan to endeavor to keep more of your assets for your heirs and not hand them over to the government by way of taxes.

Caring for elderly loved ones, yourself or others, is not cheap. Assisted living facilities, nursing homes, and hospice care can easily run thousands of dollars a month and, as such, most people cannot afford to pay for it out of pocket for very long. We’ve all heard the horror stories, people stuck in dilapidated or abusive care facilities or having to spend every last cent just for a bed in a proper facility. No one expects to spend the last years of their lives in such an appalling state, but tragically, it happens more often than you think. To combat this, many resort to relying on government assistance to pay for managed care. To qualify for that assistance, however, many people must “spend down” their assets or reduce their income in order to become eligible for government programs, namely Medicaid.

The thought of having to choose between either having a fire sale and/or willingly living in a crummy facility and/or becoming a burden on your family is hardly an attractive prospect. Everyone wants to pass as much of their money and assets on to friends and family and no one wants to become a burden. Medicaid is well aware of this and imposes a five-year “look back” period for eligibility to ensure that people don’t simply transfer their money and assets away to qualify for government benefits.

There are estate planning strategies available, however, that will allow major assets to stay within the family while still maintaining Medicaid eligibility. The Caregiver Child Exemption, also known as the Adult Child Caregiving Exemption, is perhaps the one of most popular Medicaid planning tools available to preserve assets while maintaining eligibility. An estate planning attorney is in the best position to advise you on the best course of action given your particular circumstances but becoming familiar with the landscape and legal language of Medicaid will help you make the best decisions when the time comes for action.

Why should I care/How does this benefit me?

We are all naturally self-interested, so the first question everyone asks is, how does the Medicaid Caregiver Child Exemption benefit me?

In a nutshell, this is an exemption to the five-year lookback for Medicaid eligibility that can allow you to stay in your home instead of a nursing home or assisted living facility and still receive Medicaid assistance. Regardless of how nice a managed care facility is, everyone is more comfortable in their own home. The Medicaid Caregiver Child Exemption increases the amount of time you can spend in your own home before the realities of your own health force to into a more intensive care facility.

How does the Medicaid Caregiver Child Exemption work?

To qualify for the Exemption, the caregiving child must live in the home with their parent(s) for at least two years prior to the parent becoming eligible for Medicaid benefits. Further, the caregiving child must provide a level of care that effectively prevents the parent for needing to stay in a nursing home or assisted care facility. This at-home care saves the Medicaid program money and frees up much needed bed space in Medicaid approved facilities, hence the reason Medicaid offers the Exemption in the first place.

To effectively understand how the Exemption operates, and exploit it to the fullest extent, one must understand its constituent parts. Note, all the following criteria must be satisfied in order for the Exemption to apply.

What’s a “Child” under the Exemption?

A child under the Exemption is limited only to a biological or legally adopted child. A niece, nephew, grandchild, cousin, aunt, uncle, or stepchild does not count. Medicaid constricts eligible transfers only to direct decedents in order to prevent abuse of the Exemption and because, more often than not, our children are the ones who are going to step up and provide the needed care for parents.

To prove a qualifying family relationship, usually a birth certificate or adoption certificate is used.

What’s a “Home” under the Exemption?

The only “homes” eligible for the Exemption are those of primary residence. No vacation homes, secondary residences, or rental properties. Further, the child caregiver and the parent must reside together for the entirety of the two years. Medicaid wants to ensure the home is actually being used to provide healthcare for the parent in lieu of a managed care facility. If an adult child and parent are living together for an extended period of time, its more likely the Exemption is being used for legitimate purposes rather than a cover for an improper transfer of property.

To prove a qualifying home, evidence such as utility bills, tax returns, of government ID’s for both the parent and child caregiver for at least two years prior to Medicaid eligibility are sufficient.

What’s “Care” under the Exemption?

A child simply living with a parent, cooking meals, doing laundry, picking up medication, is not enough. The amount and manner of care must be enough to establish to Medicaid that the labors of the child caregiver is the reason why the parent isn’t in a nursing home or assisted living facility. If such labor is the difference between the parent staying at home or taking up a bed in a professional facility, then the non-disqualifying transfer of the home to the child is justified.

Establishing the proper level of care is the hardest criteria to prove. This is usually established by having the primary care physician of the parent complete and sign a Medicaid form clearly documenting the care provided by the child. Legal documentation that the care of the child prevented institutionalization of the parent during the two-year lookback is required as well. Any additional documents from family, friends, and medical professionals demonstrating the labors of the child caregiver is beneficial as well.

How to Apply

You don’t file or apply to use the Exemption in the conventional sense. When applying for Medicaid, you also submit the documentation establishing the transfer of your home to your child qualifies for the Exemption. Obtaining the required documentation to prove the applicability of the Exemption is the hardest part. Further, because the burden of proof lies with the applicant, Medicaid will show no leniency for mistakes or omissions.

This is why Medicaid planning and retaining legal counsel is so critical. The Exemption criteria should be met as soon as practical, so the two-year look back can start running as soon as possible. Further, an attorney can ensure all the documentation and forms are properly filled out, executed, and mailed to the proper government agency. Last the thing you want is to find out you have months or years of additional Medicaid ineligibility because an additional penalty period was accrued due to improperly gifting your home to your child.

What if I mess up and the Exemption doesn’t apply?

If the transfer of the home was improper, Medicaid will deny that the Exemption apples, consider the house a qualifying asset, and a penalty period will accrue in proportion to the value of the house. This means on top of the two years that the child caregiver must live with a parent before Medicaid eligibility, a period of further ineligibility is added. This period is determined based on the dollar amount of value of the house divided by either the average monthly private patient rate or daily private patient rate of nursing home care in Ohio.

The home that you lived in for years, if not decades, is one of your most valuable assets, both financially and emotionally. Old age, however, means significant money is needed to live comfortably, even more so in the event of illness or disease. Wise use of the Medicaid Child Caregiver Exemption can cut off years of Medicaid ineligibility and enable comfortable and convenient caregiving for families with ailing parents. Use of the Exemption, however, is not guaranteed and proper steps must be taken. This is why an experienced estate planning attorney can mean the difference between living in your own house receiving much-needed government assistance or waiting years for help or being forced in live in second-rate managed care facilities.

Also, should an elderly individual already be receiving Medicaid benefits, the family should contact a local Cleveland estate planning attorney and find out if the Medicaid Child Caregiver Exemption is still available.

You don’t have to be rich to protect what you’ve spent a lifetime trying to build. To find out whether a trust is right for your family, take the one-minute questionnaire at www.DoIneedaTrust.com. There are a number of different trusts available and the choices are infinite. With every scenario, careful consideration of every trust planning strategy should be considered for the maximum asset protection and tax savings. For more information, you can contact Mike Benjamin of Baron Law LLC at 216-573-3723. Baron Law LLC is a Cleveland, Ohio area law firm focusing on estate planning and elder law. Mike can also be reached at mike@baronlawcleveland.com.

Helping You And Your Loved Ones Plan For The Future

About the author: Mike E. Benjamin, Esq.

Mike is a contracted attorney at Baron Law LLC who specializes in civil litigation, estate planning, and probate law. He is a member of the Westshore Bar Association, the Ohio State Bar Association, the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association, and the Federal Bar Association for the Northern District of Ohio. He can be reached at mike@baronlawcleveland.com.

Disclaimer:

The information contained herein is general in nature, is provided for informational and educational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or tax advice. The author nor Baron Law LLC cannot and does not guarantee that such information is accurate, complete, or timely. Laws of a particular state or laws that may be applicable in a given situation may impact the applicability, accuracy, or completeness of the preceding information. Further, federal and state laws and regulations are complex and subject to change. Changes in such laws often have material impact on estate planning and tax forecasts. As such, the author and Baron Law LLC make no warranties regarding the herein information or any results arising from its use. Furthermore, the author and Baron Law LLC disclaim any liability arising out of your use of, or any financial position taken in reliance on, such information. As always consult an attorney regarding your specific legal or tax situation. 

Trust Administration Attorney

Common Reasons Why Family Trusts Are Important

Baron Law LLC, Cleveland, Ohio, offers information for you to reflect upon while you are setting out looking for an estate planning attorney to help protect as much of your assets as you can. For more comprehensive information contact Baron Law Cleveland to draft your comprehensive estate plan to endeavor to keep more of your assets for your heirs and not hand them over to the government by way of taxes.

Trusts are lauded as an almost indispensable component of estate planning. This largely stems from the ability to outright negate the tax burden upon an estate through the use of martial exemptions, the unified tax credit, and deductions. Nuanced trust use and understanding of the internal revenue code prevents an estate, of which a family has spent a lifetime of labor on, from being consumed by taxes, such as the generation-skipping tax, federal estate tax, and gift tax.

Apart from the overt tax benefits, trusts also afford grantors and beneficiaries a host of secondary benefits. From ensuring comfortable living during senior years and Medicaid eligibility to confirming trust asset longevity and legitimacy, a well drafted, implemented, and managed trust can provide decades of support and peace of mind for surviving friends and family. The following are four not widely-known benefits of using a trust. Nowadays trusts are a ubiquitous but misunderstood estate planning tool. As such, knowing all the ways trusts can work for you helps in deciding if you want to incorporate one into your estate plan.

Primacy of Trusts over UTMA Custodial Accounts (Conveyances to Minors)

Apart from financial aid and personal savings, a common way to help pay for college tuition and associated expenses is a UTMA custodial account. As with any large expense, a little foresight and planning can make a big difference. The Uniform Transfer to Minors Act, i.e. the UTMA, is a potentially advantageous vehicle for the creation of a college savings account.

In Ohio, children under 18 can’t receive direct inheritance. As such, UTMA accounts are available to control and protect assets for minors until they reach they reach the chosen age of termination, between 18 and 25. These accounts are privileged to non-taxed and partially taxed earnings amounts, up to a limited amount, and are simple to create. Though expedient to make, using trusts to house assets for college often is more preferable in particular circumstances.

For a UTMA account, at the age of termination, the beneficiary gets control of the assets. This may pose an untenable risk of frivolous spending or mismanagement. Further, the age of termination is statutorily prescribed, meaning if a grantor desires continued oversight or staggered distribution, such is unavailable. Trusts on the other hand are free to impose continued control and measured distribution thus ensuring asset longevity and more nuanced settlor control. Furthermore, UTMA accounts count as an asset for financial aid eligibility which could reduce available financial assistance or foreclose it entirely. Also, the preferential tax treatment of UTMA accounts are only really effective for smaller gifts. As such, for larger gifts, the tax benefits of using UTMA transfer is negated. Thus, in many circumstances and for many people trusts are preferable for minor conveyances. Contact a local estate planning attorney to find out if a UTMA account or personalized trust plan is right for you.

Professional Rules Mandating Due Diligence

Trust formation is a measured and complex process often undertaken with attorney guidance. As such, an attorney’s ethical obligations of due diligence and competent representation control during trust creation and management.

Because attorneys are ethically bound to do a good job, a secondary benefit of using a trust is the unsung legwork attorneys put in to support a trust and fulfill their duties. For example, confirming a complete chain of title or the existence of valid deeds and signatures. Often long-term or complex assets are rife with unrecognized errors or hibernating claims of ownership. A watchful and dutiful attorney will disarm any surprises before assets are housed within a trust, surprises which would otherwise go unnoticed in the absence of a trust and the supporting attorney. Again, hiring an experienced Cleveland estate planning attorney can save you and your beneficiaries a lot of time and stress down the line.

Deliberate Election of Trustee Experts

A critical component of trust formation is the selection of a trustee. The trustee is responsible for managing trust assets and making distribution per the grantor’s instructions. The importance of this position should not be understated.

Often, however, trust assets are investment accounts, land, or securities. Each asset type possesses its own laws and requisite knowledge to manage effectively. Since trusts are estate planning tools crafted over months, attorneys regularly counsel the appointment of trustees with expertise reflective to trust assets, not just a close family member with little understanding regarding the management of trust assets. Willingness of a grantor to use a trust, with the associated time and resource costs, means a grantor will go the extra mile to pick the best trustee for the job. The right person in the right place can make all the difference.

Privacy
It is a little-known fact that trusts also, by their very nature, protect the privacy of the grantor and the assets placed within the trust. When a person dies with a will, the will goes through probate. Because probate files are publicly accessible court documents, anyone can read the will. Thus bequests, beneficiaries, creditor claims, and any other personal information is obtainable by anyone, for any reason. Trusts, on the other hand, are confidential. Since trusts are private agreements, beneficiaries, trust assets, and the trust estate structure are protected from those not meant to know.

Any internet search about trusts will return volumes of results concerning all the multitudes of trusts out there. From self-needs trust, to tax-shelter trusts, to family trusts, trusts reflect the needs and goals of their creators. Trusts, however, are not a hot or common topic of conversation. As such, not many know, unless they sit down with their Ohio estate planning attorney, of all the ways trusts can mitigate, eliminate, or avoid personal or family problems. In an effort to inform people regarding trusts, and if they are something a particular person should look into, go to www.doineedatrust.com and take a 1-minute quiz. The only thing you’ve got to lose is 1-minute, but you could be saving yourself thousands over your lifetime.

Helping You And Your Loved Ones Plan For The Future

About the author: Mike E. Benjamin, Esq.

Mike is a contracted attorney at Baron Law LLC who specializes in civil litigation, estate planning, and probate law. He is a member of the Westshore Bar Association, the Ohio State Bar Association, the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association, and the Federal Bar Association for the Northern District of Ohio. He can be reached at mike@baronlawcleveland.com.

Disclaimer:

The information contained herein is general in nature, is provided for informational and educational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or tax advice. The author nor Baron Law LLC cannot and does not guarantee that such information is accurate, complete, or timely. Laws of a particular state or laws that may be applicable in a given situation may impact the applicability, accuracy, or completeness of the preceding information. Further, federal and state laws and regulations are complex and subject to change. Changes in such laws often have material impact on estate planning and tax forecasts. As such, the author and Baron Law LLC make no warranties regarding the herein information or any results arising from its use. Furthermore, the author and Baron Law LLC disclaim any liability arising out of your use of, or any financial position taken in reliance on, such information. As always consult an attorney regarding your specific legal or tax situation.

Baron Law Cleveland Trust

Ohio Trusts – Can Out-Of-State Lawyers Draft Them?

Baron Law LLC, Cleveland, Ohio, offers information for you to reflect upon while you are setting out looking for an estate planning attorney to help protect as much of your assets as you can. For more comprehensive information contact Baron Law Cleveland to draft your comprehensive estate plan to endeavor to keep more of your […]

House in Trust with Mortgage

Terminating Irrevocable Trusts I: Changing What Can’t Be Changed

Baron Law LLC, Cleveland, Ohio, offers information for you to reflect upon while you are setting out looking for an estate planning attorney to help protect as much of your assets as you can.  For more comprehensive information contact Baron Law Cleveland to draft your comprehensive estate plan to endeavor to keep more of your assets for your heirs and not hand them over to the government by way of taxes.

Irrevocable trusts are trusts in which the grantor, i.e. the trust maker, relinquishes all control and ownership over the trust and the assets used to fund the trust. Thus, in theory, the trust can only be changed or canceled per the ways denoted by trusts terms and usually only then with the blessing of the trustee and/or trust beneficiaries.  

So, why would anyone give up control to another and chose to use irrevocable trusts? Conversely with living trusts, grantors keep “the keys” to the trust while with irrevocable trusts “the keys” are given up. In the eyes of the law, generally, what is inside an irrevocable trust no longer belongs to the grantor. Thus, grantors aren’t taxed on what’s inside these trusts and those with claims against the grantor can’t extend potential recovery to these assets as well. This is all well and good, but with everything in life, situations change. A previous estate plan, and accompanying established trusts, sometimes no longer serve the best interest of the grantor and their family. With current sky-high estate tax exemptions, the normal administrative costs associated with trust management, and, perhaps, an adjusting need for liquidity or differing type of asset control, some individuals are evaluating whether it’s worth keeping an irrevocable trust. If this is you, don’t despair. Despite what their name suggests, irrevocable, there are ways to terminate an irrevocable trust. Before, however, anything drastic like trust termination occurs, always consult an experienced Cleveland estate planning attorney to figure out all your options and plot the best course of action.  

Now if after consultation with professionals regarding your estate plan reveals that your irrevocable trust no longer serves your best interests, termination is an option. There are several methods for terminating trusts in Ohio, termination by court order, termination via private agreement, and termination by discretionary distribution. This blog concerns primarily the first method, court ordered trust termination.

   1.Court-Ordered Trust Termination  

In 2007 Ohio passed the Ohio Trust Code which governs the creation, management, and termination of trusts. Chapter 5804 primarily is the vehicle courts use to terminate trusts depending on the circumstances. Now, the most common circumstances in which this method of termination is used is either via independent motion on a probate court to terminate a trust for justifiable cause or as a recovery prayer in a civil suit that someway touches on a trust significantly enough to justify termination. Again, consult an experienced Ohio estate planning attorney, they will know when, how, and where to commence trust termination proceedings.    

       A.Trust Termination by Revocation or by Terms 

Per O.R.C. § 5804.10, a trust may be terminated to the extent that a court finds that: 

  1. It is revoked or expired pursuant to its terms; 
  2. There is no remaining purpose of the trust to be achieved; 
  3. The purpose of the trust has become unlawful or impossible. 

This particular code section denotes the authority/power of the court to terminate a trust. The respective standing, or ability, for a grantor, trustee, and trust beneficiary to petition to terminate a trust are also denoted within the Ohio Trust Code. Note, however, that within R.C. § 5804.10 no mention of settlor, trustee, or beneficiary consent is denoted. This means that if a court thinks termination of a trust is appropriate, they can do so. Now whether or not a particular probate court will take the feelings and considerations of the settlor, trustee, or beneficiaries into account when deciding to terminate a trust is dependent on the judge and jurisdiction. Again, you never can guarantee a particular outcome when you resort to court intervention. That is why you should always consult with an estate planning attorney before asking a court to do anything with your trust.        

        B. Termination of Noncharitable Irrevocable Trust 

Per O.R.C. § 5804.11, an irrevocable trust can be terminated by agreement, authorized by a court, with the consent of the settlor and all of the beneficiaries. Note, however, the trustee’s consent is not required. Though technically a court must approve of termination via § 5804.11, if all valid consent is obtained from the settlor and beneficiaries and all are competent to give such consent, a probate court will almost always approve of the termination and issue the order even if such termination is inconsistent with the terms of the trust and the trust’s material purposes.  

       C. Court Intervention Due to Changing Circumstances  

 Per O.R.C. § 5804.12, a probate court may terminate a trust due to a change in circumstances that has occurred since its creation. Per this section of the Ohio Trust Code:   

(A) The court may modify the terms of a trust or terminate the trust if because of circumstances not anticipated by the settlor modification or termination will further the purposes of the trust. To the extent practicable, the court shall make the modification in accordance with the settlor’s probable intention. 

(B) The court may modify the administrative terms of a trust if continuation of the trust on its existing terms would be impracticable or impair the trust’s administration. 

Further, upon termination of trust via this section, the trustee must distribute the trust property in a manner consistent with the purposes of the trust. O.R.C. § 5804.12 (C). An action under this section to terminate a trust may only be brought by a trustee or beneficiary and a court must act as close as possible to the probable wishes of the settlor but only to the extent practicable in the circumstances. Further, a termination under this section must be due to circumstances not anticipated by the settlor and such termination must be in accordance with the trust purposes. As such, though circumstances may allow for termination of a trust, interested parties just being disgruntled or dissatisfied with a trust’s management is not sufficient to warrant termination.    

Trusts are a useful estate planning tool to ensure increased permanence of your lifetime earnings and instructions down through the generations. Like all things, however, nothing is unalterable. Being aware of the potential reasons and methods for revoking irrevocable trusts can allow a settlor to dictate more effective terms but also allow avenues for change if completely unexpected or frustrating events occur. An experienced Cleveland estate planning attorney is invaluable in creating, managing, and, if the time comes, terminating your trusts.     

 Helping You And Your Loved Ones Plan For The Future

About the Author: 

Mike is a contracted attorney at Baron Law LLC who specializes in civil litigation, estate planning, and probate law. He is a member of the Westshore Bar Association, the Ohio State Bar Association, the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association, and the Federal Bar Association for the Northern District of Ohio. He can be reached at mike@baronlawcleveland.com.   

Disclaimer: 

The information contained herein is general in nature, is provided for informational and educational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or tax advice. The author nor Baron Law LLC cannot and does not guarantee that such information is accurate, complete, or timely. Laws of a particular state or laws that may be applicable in a given situation may impact the applicability, accuracy, or completeness of the preceding information. Further, federal and state laws and regulations are complex and subject to change. Changes in such laws often have material impact on estate planning and tax forecasts. As such, the author and Baron Law LLC make no warranties regarding the herein information or any results arising from its use. Furthermore, the author and Baron Law LLC disclaim any liability arising out of your use of, or any financial position taken in reliance on, such information. As always consult an attorney regarding your specific legal or tax situation.

Baron Law LLC Independence Ohio

Fully Utilizing Your Attorney: Document Review

Baron Law, LLC is your trusted law firm for business owners and entrepreneurs. Don’t wait until it’s too late to consult/hire a business attorney for your legal issues.

Our society is highly litigious, and, consequently, it seems like everything is fully documented nowadays. Gone are the days of handshake deals and taking people at their honor and word. In the preceding decades lawyers have come in and added red tape and procedure into almost every facet of life. From credit cards to bank loans, to getting a new patio installed and enrolling your children in school, there is lengthy paperwork to fill out and lengthy procedure to adhere to. Often it is what you don’t know that harms you. People sign without reading or agree to terms they only partially understand. And it is always more difficult to fight against terms you already agreed to, that is why exercising a little restraint and doing a little research before you sign is always the more preferential option.

Recognizing a deficiency in comprehension is only half the battle and it is often a prospect people are too prideful to recognize. Naturally, not everyone is going to be an expert in everything. Heart surgeons often can’t expertly shingle a roof and vice versa. Many people use the services of attorneys but most fail to use them to their full potential. Attorneys are licensed experts who spend their days dealing with issues and problems that most don’t want to spend hours, days, or even weeks of reading and learning to become experts in. Recognizing an impending difficulty and being willing to retain the services of an expert can save you a lot of time and money in the short term, but also put you in a more advantageous position to guard against, or exploit, potential problems in the future.

I. Why have your attorney review your documents?

It’s a widely held view that two sets of eyes are better than one and that a fresh set of eyes can see things that you would miss. Further, in the context of retaining the services of an experienced attorney, they are often aware of potential issues and problems that a lay person would be ignorant of. The name of the game is expert consultation. Attorneys possess areas of expertise because they deal with the same areas of law and associated problems and issues day in and day out.

Though some are aware that using the expert services of an attorney might be helpful, however, a lot of times, 1) people don’t know what experts they need, 2) don’t know how to find such experts, and 3) not all experts are created equal, which ones will actually help you rather than hurt. An experienced and established attorney will know which experts you need, which ones are trustworthy, and which ones won’t cost you an arm and a leg to talk to.

At the end of the day, using attorneys saves you time and money. Attorneys are trained to read fast and think fast, and an experienced attorney will be able to accomplish in a faction of the time what you can attempt to do yourself. Often people need and want answers to their questions as soon as possible.

For example, a recent client came in regarding collection on a judgment via garnishment proceedings in municipal court. Little did he know; such judgment was discharged by a chapter 7 bankruptcy. So, if he attempted to collect he would be in contempt of the bankruptcy order and, curiously, he would then face possible liability from the debtor. Most ordinary individuals don’t have extensive experience with collections or bankruptcy law. In this instance, a simple sit down with an attorney likely saved him thousands of dollars and avoided a contempt charge.

II. In what situations would you have your attorney review?

The situations in which it would be advantageous to seek the counsel of an experienced attorney are numerous. Every person, family, company, and business deal have their own nuances and concerns. Generally, however, if you are saying to yourself either 1) I don’t want to take the time to figure out X, or 2) I don’t understand what Y is saying, or 3) I’m pretty sure I understand Z but I want to be fully confident I’m not missing anything important, it’s probably a good idea to at least sit down and talk with an attorney.

The following is a list, non-exhaustive, of types of matters Baron Law has looked into previously. Other law firms and other attorneys, naturally, can help with other matters that match their specialties or areas of concentration.

Land Contracts

Deeds

Buy/Sell Agreements

Business Succession Plans

Partnership Agreements

Articles of Incorporation

Purchase Agreements, Goods and Services

Eviction Petitions

Garnishment Application

Guardianship Applications

HOA Contracts


III. Cost v. Risk

When it comes down to it, regardless of the all the reasons why you should consult with an attorney about a particular matter, it’s going to come down to cost and risk. How much is hiring an attorney going to cost me vs. how much am I risking by not doing my due diligence? Often the answer hinges on the financial stakes. If you are investing $300,000 in a business venture, you’re going to spend a little money to make absolutely sure your money is protected and your getting a good deal. In similar situations, using attorneys to protect yourself is self-evident.

In other situations, the necessity of attorney counsel is less-evident but nonetheless critical. Even for minor business ventures, simple contracts for services, or party-to-party transactions, the significant threat of potential litigation and the loss of invested blood, sweat, and tears is still there. Thus, the expert guidance of attorneys remains your best line of defense. The human psyche is strange in that $100 doesn’t mean much unless it’s your $100. When it comes to protecting your money, your assets, and your business deals, doing the little extra of hiring an experienced Cleveland attorney makes sense and almost always pays for itself regardless of the context.

About the author: Mike E. Benjamin, Esq.

Mike is a contracted attorney at Baron Law LLC who specializes in civil litigation, estate planning, and probate law. He is a member of the Westshore Bar Association, the Ohio State Bar Association, the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association, and the Federal Bar Association for the Northern District of Ohio. He can be reached at mike@baronlawcleveland.com.

Disclaimer:

The information contained herein is general in nature, is provided for informational and educational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or tax advice. The author nor Baron Law LLC cannot and does not guarantee that such information is accurate, complete, or timely. Laws of a particular state or laws that may be applicable in a given situation may impact the applicability, accuracy, or completeness of the preceding information. Further, federal and state laws and regulations are complex and subject to change. Changes in such laws often have material impact on estate planning and tax forecasts. As such, the author and Baron Law LLC make no warranties regarding the herein information or any results arising from its use. Furthermore, the author and Baron Law LLC disclaim any liability arising out of your use of, or any financial position taken in reliance on, such information. As always consult an attorney regarding your specific legal or tax situation.